High ROH - a topic covered in a chapter of "The DNA Guide for Adoptees"

I recently got this feedback on The DNA Guide for Adoptees from a reader:

“I learned a lot! Very informative and sensitive to so many things.  I especially appreciated how tactfully written the high ROH chapter was (high ROH=when birth parents are related to each other). It’s a sensitive topic but was very tactfully done.

The reader continued on… 

The DNA Guide for Adoptees - #1 New Release in Genetics on Amazon

The DNA Guide for Adoptees - #1 New Release in Genetics on Amazon

Exciting news today as The DNA Guide for Adoptees has released in #1 new release for genetics. I’m looking forward to the information and support falling into people’s hands whether their preference is paperback or Kindle.

The book covers a lot of ground and is divided into four sections:

  • Getting Started

  • Bringing Science and Research Together through Genetic Genealogy

  • What to Do After the DNA Testing is Done

  • DNA Tests and the Search for Health Information

Mental Health Awareness and my thoughts on "Baby Doe" cases

Mental Health Awareness and my thoughts on "Baby Doe" cases

May is Mental Health Awareness month, and today I am opening the conversation about a hidden issue that affects millions of Americans and others around the globe. This was a painful post to write as it brought up difficult memories from my past professional work.

The DNA Guide for Adoptees: new book offers information and guidance for adoptive parents as well

The DNA Guide for Adoptees: new book offers information and guidance for adoptive parents as well

The book "The DNA Guide for Adoptees" currently available on Amazon for Kindle preorders is nearing publication! On May 30th, readers can find it on Kindle and in print in a paperback version. My co-author Shannon and I are busily preparing to be ready for reader questions and comments and are planning genealogy and genetics conference booth appearances in the summer and fall.

Announcing the upcoming release of the book "The DNA Guide for Adoptees"

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I’m excited to announce the book I have written with my friend Shannon Combs-Bennett is available for preorder on Kindle! The DNA Guide for Adoptees will be available as a Kindle e-book and in print starting May 30th, 2019 on Amazon.com.

Shannon and I met in 2016 while attending a week-long workshop, the Advanced Genetic Genealogy course run by the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh.

We have both worked with family, friends, and clients using DNA testing in family searches. The melding of our minds as a genetic counselor and a genealogist has led to a book that covers a wide range of DNA topics for the audience of people using DNA for family searches and medical reasons.

Listen to Thomas MacEntee mention it during his discussion of consumer tests on the podcast Not Old, Better (it comes up around minute 16:00). Thomas has helped us prepare and launch our book to the benefit of readers, and we are grateful to him for it!

I will be blogging more about the book in the upcoming weeks to address questions about the sub-topics we cover and how it will benefit readers. I also talk about the book on an upcoming podcast on June 7th with Kira Dineen of DNA Today. Watch for it!

Are you a library, book store, adoption, genetics professional, or genealogy group interested in a visit and book signing with the authors? Reach out to express interest in getting on the schedule for an in-person or virtual book tour visit for your group.

“Objects may appear closer than they are…” - self-identity reflections from Maggy’s NPE discovery at age 54

“Objects may appear closer than they are…” - self-identity reflections from Maggy’s NPE discovery at age 54

Today we’re lucky enough to share a post entitled “Objects may appear closer than they are…” written in 2013 by a woman named Maggy. We’ve heard from others who discover they are NPEs (not the parent expected) in our #DNASurprise series of guest blog posts, but what happens when this discovery comes later in life? After you’ve spent five decades thinking you know the ins and outs of your family tree?

When Maggy was 54 years old, she discovered that her mother wasn’t who she thought she was. Throughout the ups and downs of her discovery, Maggy has shared insightful blog posts – cathartic not only for her but also providing valuable insight to others going through similar experiences. Throughout her post, we see the theme of identity, and how DNA surprises can impact a person’s sense of self and belonging.

Brief explainer on a first versus second cousin

Brief explainer on a first versus second cousin

What’s the difference between a first cousin, a first cousin, once removed and a second cousin? I get this question a lot! I usually end up explaining it at least once during Thanksgiving dinner each year.

Cousins who share a set of grandparents because their parents are full siblings are first cousins.

Cousins who share one grandparent because their parents are half siblings are half-first-cousins.

Cousins who share a set of great-grandparents because their parents are first cousins and their grandparents are siblings are second cousins.

“Removed” comes in when the two people in questions are from different generations.

A bit about sibling DNA sharing, in honor of National Sibling Day

A bit about sibling DNA sharing, in honor of National Sibling Day

Did you know that by textbook definition, full siblings (brothers and sisters who share a common mother AND father) are supposed to have about 50% of their DNA in common? From projects like the crowd-sourced data collection project by DNA Central founder Blaine Bettinger — The Shared cM Project explained well in this post by Leah Larkin — we have learned that human biology doesn’t always follow the rules!

DNA testing and family medical history: a short intro for genealogists

DNA testing and family medical history: a short intro for genealogists

Genealogists are a creative bunch, and I love to read about the information they discover and record about family. Some genealogists track down death certificates and record the official cause of death for ancestors. Others learn medical history from living relatives and write that down. I quietly applaud when I read about someone finding and saving medical information on ancestors and relatives like this!

As a genetic counselor and genealogist, family medical history will always be an important in my eyes. This information is difficult to retrieve once relatives pass away.  

MTHFR - a new article on Self.com lays out the facts

MTHFR - a new article on Self.com lays out the facts

There is a lot of misinformation spreading online about a gene all of us have called MTHFR. (We each have two copies it, actually: one from mom and one from dad.)

Self Magazine published an article this week specifically addressing the MTHFR gene and all the facts we know about it. It was written by Tara C. Smith, a person with a PhD in epidemiology. Epidemiology is the study of how different factors influence the health of people, and those with a PhD are trained to understand the outcome of studies at both the group level (large populations) and at the individual level (YOU!).

I read this article yesterday and feel like it is the BEST ARTICLE to date on MTHFR. It will be accessible to most readers, no matter your level of knowledge about DNA or genetics research.