Learning from Teaching Together: The Next Base Pair is Beth and Rachel

Meet Beth and Rachel! They make a perfect Base Pair as they've paired up multiple times to co-teach classes about genetics to students of OLLI at Duke University. OLLI institutes were founded with the goal of allowing every person, no matter age or life stage, to continue learning in the university setting.

Instruction about DNA was not likely part of the grade school or high school curriculum for many current OLLI students, so how exciting and important they be given the opportunity today! It's never too late in life to learn something new, and everyone should have a chance to learn about DNA, the fascinating molecule that it is. 

A special shout-out goes to Nancy Callanan, Rachel's genetic counseling program director at UNC Greensboro, for being the person who connected Rachel and Beth. 

Hooray for genetics educators...and for the match-makers who help pair talented individuals into dynamic duos!    

Beth and Rachel stand in front of Bishops House in Durham, North Carolina. This is one location on the Duke University campus where OLLI courses are held.

How did you get interested in genetic counseling?

Beth: I was working in Dorothy Warburton's cytogenetics lab at Columbia University when a student arrived for her rotation [educational internship]. She explained that she was in the Genetic Counseling Graduate Program at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York. Although I loved lab work, I always wondered what people did with the information they got from their results. I applied to Sarah Lawrence the following year, 1975, after talking with her. 

Rachel: I first learned of genetic counseling when I was a junior in high school – my genetics class visited the Greenwood Genetic Center in Greenwood, South Carolina where I heard about different career options in the field of genetics. Genetic counseling clicked for me—I loved genetics, but wasn’t sure if lab work or med school was for me, so genetic counseling was the perfect fit.

Did you learn about genetic counseling from someone in you knew, or did you influence someone else to attend school for genetic counseling? 

Beth: Over the years, I have spoken to numerous people and am proud to say several have become genetic counselors--and leaders in the field too. I still take the opportunity to speak about a career in Genetic Counseling when students contact me via the NSGC website. 

Rachel: Over the years, I’ve met with many high school and college students to discuss genetic counseling as a career option. A number of them have gone on to be GCs, including a college boyfriend’s younger sister!

What's your special connection to your Base Pair buddy? 

Beth: Rachel and I co-teach a course. (See her terrific answer).  Her research skills and current genetics knowledge mix well with my clinical expertise and perspective. Her technical/computer skills are outstanding and in my "advanced age" I have learned a lot from her. She even taught me how to participate in a Twitter chat! 

Rachel: We both live and work in Durham, North Carolina and co-teach a continuing education course through Duke’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) entitled “Healthcare Personalized for You: Understanding Genomics and Precision Medicine.” Our knowledge and experience complement each other, offering a great opportunity for OLLI students to better understand genetics, genomics, and genomic testing. 

What else would be of interest to readers? 

Beth: Working with a GC from another generation has renewed my enthusiasm for our field and the NSGC. Genetic Counseling was great when I started in the '70's and will continue to be great in the future. The field has grown tremendously and, I think, will continue to grow as an integral service in our healthcare system, especially with GCs like Rachel leading the way. 

Rachel: Our age difference make us an interesting and unexpected pair, but it has been so fun working together. We’ve both learned a lot from each other. Beth’s life and work experiences have given me a great perspective on how the field has changed over the years, and I’ve taught Beth about Twitter!


More about Beth: Elizabeth (Beth) Balkite has been a certified genetic counselor for over 30 years. She is an alumna of the Joan H. Marks Graduate Program in Human Genetics at Sarah Lawrence College. She worked as a genetic counselor in Connecticut at the University of Connecticut Health Center, Yale University, and Norwalk Hospital prior to joining Genzyme Genetics as manager of Clinical Genetics Services in 1993. From 1998-2006 she worked as the Genetics Education Strategy Advisor for GlaxoSmithKline. She continued as a genetics educator in several capacities before retiring in 2012.  She has studied her own family history for three years and is now one of the few genetic counselors to practice and teach genetic genealogy. She is an instructor at the Osher Life Long Learning Institute (OLLI) at Duke University in Durham, NC, where she co-teaches two courses: “Applying DNA to Your Family Tree,” and “Personalized Medicine”.

More about Rachel: Rachel Mills is a research genetic counselor at Duke in the Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine. Her research work focuses on implementation of precision medicine, particularly pharmacogenetics. Rachel is also a consultant with PWNHealth, and provides tele-genetic counseling services. Rachel is passionate about genetics education and will be returning to school this year to pursue a PhD in adult continuing professional education. She is an active volunteer with the National Society of Genetic Counselors and the NC Medical Genetics Association, and regularly serves as a thesis committee member for genetic counseling graduate students.  

Like reading the Base Pair series? Read about my past couples including:

 a husband/wife couple of genetic counselors who met in graduate school  

sisters-in-law who earned their degrees at different times

friends who once had a genetic counselor/patient relationship 

a mentor/mentee couple who now run a business together

Know a pair of genetic counselors who share a unique relationship? Perhaps two GCs who job-share or who work as a pair to cover the needs for an institution or geographic region? Send your recommendations to me, and maybe you'll see them highlighted in a future post!