NPE

Research Opportunity for DNA Testers

If you have not yet tested, but are getting ready to, the UBC Genetic Connections Study would like you to participate in their study. They will follow your experience before and after your results come back. Website: https://delongis.psych.ubc.ca/ubc-genetic-connections-study/

Umbilical Cord Blood Donation and Ancestry Testing

Umbilical cord blood donation allows a type of stem cell transplant. This is my third post specifically about stem cell transplants and ancestry testing and it’s the first that focuses specifically on umbilical cord blood. You can read the first two about a case of bone marrow transplantation affecting an ancestry test result and how to try to go about DNA testing if you have already received a stem cell donation:

One year ago today, I was on the NBC Today show...

One year ago today, I was on the NBC Today show...

One year ago today, I had the surreal experience of sitting on the stage of the Megyn Kelly NBC Today show to answer questions about my work with people who make DNA surprise discoveries after DNA testing. To call it memorable would be an understatement!

Watch the clip here

"Dear Brianne...I reached out to my unexpected half-sister but now I'm worried. Did I jump the gun?"

"Dear Brianne...I reached out to my unexpected half-sister but now I'm worried. Did I jump the gun?"

I recently received a message from someone who made an unexpected discovery of a new family member after doing DNA testing. The parents involved are all since deceased, and the person who wrote me had written to her match welcoming her to the family and then began to have regrets. Had she considered the other person’s reaction?

As more NPE discoveries are made, these types of questions grow more frequent. Ready my brief response to “Excited but Now Concerned” below.

Should people have at-home DNA tests for medical purposes?

Should people have at-home DNA tests for medical purposes?

I’m often asked for my thoughts on whether at-home DNA tests should be used for medical purposes, since they are the only option some people can afford.

This a complex question, but it is one I have thought about and continue to think about.

It’s hard to answer succinctly because of all the moving parts -- access to an ordering provider for clinical DNA tests, additional costs for getting customized support or counseling support, the next steps to take in the medical system if a test is positive, etc. -- I address some of these in my recently published book since I am very close to all of these moving pieces and will write just a bit about it here.

To Birth Wives…there is growing support for you if you’re the wife of husbands in reunion with a daughter newly-found from DNA Testing

To Birth Wives…there is growing support for you if you’re the wife of husbands in reunion with a daughter newly-found from DNA Testing

One by one, women have begun to reach out to me. They describe a similar scenario.

Their husbands were unaware they had fathered a child in the past (typically, it's a daughter).

That child is now an adult.

Consumer DNA testing helped reunite the adult child with their father.

These situations involve a lot of emotions for everyone, including the adult child, the father, his wife/significant other, and other children in the family.

Brianne Kirkpatrick Quoted in PhillyVoice article on unexpected DNA surprises

I recently spoke with Brian Hickey who writes for PhillyVoice. In this piece which covers the topic of support after unexpected DNA discoveries, I shared my thoughts on the topic and touched briefly on the role grief and support play in these experiences.

You can find the article HERE.

"I think I figured out my father isn't my father, but I don't know what to do now."

"I think I figured out my father isn't my father, but I don't know what to do now."

If you’re searching the web because your DNA test results have totally taken you aback, I am so sorry you are going through this. Ancestry tests work like paternity testing, in that they are able to detect whether or not you are matching to close biological family correctly or not. The results can be confusing, especially to someone not familiar with the way ancestry test results are displayed.

If your results just came back today and someone you are expecting to see in your match list isn’t there, first of all give it a few days - make sure the testing company’s system has had a chance to finish working through and matching you to their large database of other testers. Sometimes you just need a little more time for all your DNA matches to show up properly.

A Call from Wendell: James's DNA Surprise Story

A Call from Wendell: James's DNA Surprise Story

TThe uncovering of one DNA surprise can sometimes have a domino effect in a family. It is understandable how words like “unraveling” are used to describe situations like this, when multiple tightly-held secrets suddenly all become known in short order, and how panicked fingers begin to point and deflect blame. In the case of James and his family, the discovery that the father who raised James wasn’t his biological father led to the same discovery for his three siblings as well.

James shares with us the painful details of his mother’s misplaced blame on him after the secrets of his and his siblings’ misattributed paternity came to light. He writes about how he has been able to cope and move forward in the year since he made his own unexpected paternity discovery.

People who are discovering NPE are meeting up in-person for support and community

People who are discovering NPE are meeting up in-person for support and community

Guest Post by Rebekah Drumsta

Something magical is happening.  All across the world people are becoming friends, both online and at pre-arranged Meet and Greets.  They are making connections with others who’ve had an NPE (Not Parent Expected) event, just like them.

Starting a blog helped Stacey cope with her DNA Surprise

Starting a blog helped Stacey cope with her DNA Surprise

Blogging to Cope with My DNA Surprise: Stacey’s Story

A couple of weeks after my 41st birthday, my world as I knew it changed forever.  It’s a story we’ve now all heard: a DNA sample submitted to an ancestry website revealed unexpected biological data.  After asking my parents about it, they finally revealed that the man who raised me was not my biological father. I had so many questions - who was my biological father? Why did they lie? How could they keep it from me for so long?  Who knew?

Making Your Existence Known to Bio Family - Should You or Shouldn't You?

Making Your Existence Known to Bio Family - Should You or Shouldn't You?

I had someone reach out to me a few months ago who was adopted and had reunited with his birth mom before she died after she sought him out. He never had interest in seeking out and reuniting with his birth father but accidentally matched to his (now deceased) bio father's family (an entire set of half-siblings) when doing an ancestry DNA test.